29 August 1882 Death of Friedrich Philippi, scholar and theologian #otdimjh

Friedrich_Adolph_Philippi

Philippi, Dr. Friedrich Adolf, was born in Berlin in 1809. His father was a banker and belonged to the circle of the Mendelssohns. Philippi received Christian impressions at school, and in riper years he received from a fellow student a treatise entitled “Glocktöne,” by Court Chaplain Strauss, which caused him to attend his sermons.

Screen Shot 2015-08-29 at 10.34.14

His uncle Jakobi, the mathematician, had at that time become an Evangelical Christian. This event, too, caused him to seek for the truth until he found it for himself and was then baptized by Pastor Zehme in Grossstädtel, near Leipzig, in 1829.

download (79)

Later on he studied theology under Hengstenberg, and became professor at Dorpat and later at Rostock.

Screen Shot 2015-08-29 at 10.35.23

He was the author of the following works:—”Die Lehre von dem thätigen Gehorsam Christi,” 1841; “Glauben’s Lehre,” 1853; a posthumous work, published by his son, “On the Epistle to the Galatians and the Synoptics.” He died on August 29, 1882. [from Bernstein: Some Jewish Witnesses]

Screen Shot 2015-08-29 at 10.33.29

Prayer: Thank you Lord for the life and work of Friedrich Philippi. May Messianic Jews today be similarly devoted to the pursuit of knowledge and understanding of their faith, and live out the Talmud maxim to ‘raise up many disciples.’ In Yeshua’s name we pray. Amen.

Screen Shot 2015-08-29 at 10.33.40

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friedrich_Adolf_Philippi

http://www.amazon.com/Friedrich-Philippi/e/B00IZEQH14

Friedrich Adolf Philippi 1809-1882

Friedrich was the son of a wealthy Jewish banker, who belonged to the well-known Mendelssohn circle.  His father had the children educated in a Christian school, something not unheard of in that era.

While at primary school Friedrich received his first impressions of the Christian faith. Later, at the Gymnasium, or high-school, he began to be interested in classic studies thanks to the influence of his cousin, Jakobi.  It was in this time period that Jakobi, who became a well-known mathematician, became an earnest believer of Yeshua.  Friedrich was very interested and began to talk much with his cousin on the Bible.  Jakobi gave him a New Testament to read.  Others also noticed his interest.  A school friend gave him a copy of a book written by a well known minister, Strauss by name, and Friedrich sought him out personally.  Strauss felt at the time that the young man’s thoughts of  “becoming a Christian” like his cousin, were still immature and unripe, and did not take on his instruction in the faith.

On graduation from the high school in 1827 Friedrich decided to study philology in the university.  Again he visited Strauss, and this time the preacher agreed to teach him of the faith.  However, even after a time of study, Friedrich did not reach an inner peace or full understanding of the faith in Messiah.  Two years later we find him in Leipzig, where he visited Professor Lindner and continued his spiritual search.  Now, at last, he came to a full understanding and asked to be baptised.  His decision could not be kept a secret, and raised a furor in his parental home.  But after a time of anger, his parents made peace with him.  Many of his relatives followed his example, including his cousin Jeannette Pincson, who later became his wife.

Having completed studies of philosophy and theology at Berlin and Leipsic (Ph.D. 1831), Friedrich began to teach, with success, at a private school in Dresden and at the Joachimsthal Gymnasium at Berlin (1833). In 1837 he received his diploma as Lutheran minister, and in 1838 was admitted as privat-docent to the theological faculty of the University of Berlin. In 1841 he was elected professor of theology at the University of Dorpat; he received the degree of D.D. “honoris causa” from the University of Erlangen in 1843.

Of Philippi’s works may be mentioned: “Die Lehre vom Thätigen Gehorsam Christi,” Berlin, 1841; “Kirchliche Glaubenslehre,” Güterslohe, 1854-1879 (3d ed. 1883-85), a standard work from the Orthodox Lutheran point of view; “Vorlesungen über Symbolik,” ib. 1883.

Philipp’s eldest son became a pastor in Mecklenburg and produced the church paper; the second son became a Professor of oriental languages in Rostock, and the third a lawyer.

Philippi died on 29 August, 1882.

Sources

  1. Schulze, Friedrich Adolf Philippi, Nördlingen, 1883;
    De le Roi, Juden-Mission, 2d ed., i. 204-6, Leipsic, 1899.S. F. T. H.

By: Isidore SingerFrederick T. Haneman

Lutheran theologian; born at Berlin Oct. 15, 1809; died at Rostock Aug. 29, 1882. He was the son of a wealthy Jewish banker, a friend of Mendelssohn. Converted to Christianity in 1829, he studied philosophy and theology at Berlin and Leipsic (Ph.D. 1831), and became successively a teacher at a private school in Dresden and at the Joachimsthal’sche Gymnasium at Berlin (1833). In 1837 he received his diploma as Lutheran minister, and in 1838 was admitted as privat-docent to the theological faculty of the University of Berlin. In 1841 he was elected professor of theology at the University of Dorpat; he received the degree of D.D. “honoris causa” from the University of Erlangen in 1843.

Of Philippi’s works may be mentioned: “Die Lehre vom Thätigen Gehorsam Christi,” Berlin, 1841; “Kirchliche Glaubenslehre,” Güterslohe, 1854-1879 (3d ed. 1883-85), a standard work from the Orthodox Lutheran point of view; “Vorlesungen über Symbolik,” ib. 1883.

Bibliography:

  • Schulze, Friedrich Adolf Philippi, Nördlingen, 1883;
  • De le Roi, Juden-Mission, 2d ed., i. 204, Leipsic, 1899.
Advertisements

About richardsh

Messianic Jewish teacher in UK
This entry was posted in otdimjh and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to 29 August 1882 Death of Friedrich Philippi, scholar and theologian #otdimjh

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s